Travis Zimmer - I Did It My Way

On the third episode of Noisy Balls, I had the great privilege of interviewing Travis Zimmer, someone who many of our listeners will not know a great deal about, but after you hear his story, you will realise, how important his narrative is.

On the third episode of Noisy Balls, I had the great privilege of interviewing Travis Zimmer, someone who many of our listeners will not know a great deal about, but after you hear his story, you will realise, how important his narrative is and it really will resonate with many of you, especially if you have struggled with the difficulties of being blind or visually-impaired and how you can go about moving your life forward in a positive, productive and meaningful way.

Travis has only been involved in blind cricket for a very short time, but has already put his hand up to be fifth executive on the VBCA board. He has even achieved the great honour of playing for Victoria in this year's National Cricket Inclusion Championships and currently works as a Graphic Designer at Deakin University.

Being a keen red ball cricketer in his youth, Travis also enjoyed participating in tennis and athletics, even going on to play some footy and, for many years, umpire in a local league. Pretty amazing for someone who was gradually losing his sight.

Travis deals with a condition called usher syndrome.

Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total hearing loss and vision loss that worsens over time. The hearing loss is classified as sensorineural, which means that it is caused by abnormalities of the inner ear. The loss of vision is caused by an eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP), which affects the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina). Vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate. Night vision loss begins first, followed by blind spots that develop in the side (peripheral) vision. Over time, these blind spots enlarge and merge to produce tunnel vision. In some cases, vision is further impaired by clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). However, many people with retinitis pigmentosa retain some central vision throughout their lives.

Researchers have identified three major types of Usher syndrome, designated as types I, II, and III. These types are distinguished by the severity of hearing loss, the presence or absence of balance problems, and the age at which signs and symptoms appear.

I would like to thank Travis for coming on to Noisy Balls and telling us his account, which I know was something that was difficult for him to do, but we both feel that it was imperative that his story be told

Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.

To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls:
  • Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show.
  • Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group
  • and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally.
  • To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.
 
Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)

★ Support this podcast ★


Welcome To Noisy Balls

Noisy Balls aims to inform, entertain, and keep you abreast of the goings on in blind cricket from around the world.

Compelling discussion with fascinating people, highlighting the fact that no matter whether you are blind or visually impaired, this should never be a barrier for you to fulfill your sporting dreams.

We trust that you will enjoy your time with us and we appreciate you tuning into the podcast.


Support Noisy Balls with a Donation

If you are enjoying the content and you value what I bring to you on each episode, I ask that you consider supporting the podcast with a donation. You can set up either a recurring subscription, or a one-time donation.

Your contribution will go towards paying for the monthly podcast provider costs, the yearly domain and email server fees, as well as the monthly charges associated in running the Noisy Balls online studio, which is where I conduct all of the interviews you hear on each episode.




Social Channels

Check out the social channels for further updates from Noisy Balls. You can find and interact with the show at the following:



© 2020 The Victorian Blind Cricket Association